Understanding Const, Static, and Readonly in C#

Understanding Const, Static, and Readonly in C#

In C#, there are several keywords that are used to define and initialize constant values: const, static, and readonly. While all three of these keywords are used to define constants, they have different implications and usage scenarios.

The const keyword is used to declare a constant field or a constant local. Once a value is assigned to a const field or local, it cannot be changed at runtime. It is initialized at compile time and its value remains constant throughout the program’s execution. Const fields are implicitly static, meaning they belong to the type itself rather than an instance of the type. Const values are typically used for values that are known at compile time and are not expected to change.

On the other hand, the static keyword is used to declare a static member, which means it belongs to the type itself rather than an instance of the type. A static member is shared across all instances of the type and can be accessed without creating an instance of the type. When used with a field, the static keyword allows the field to be initialized once and shared across all instances of the type. Static fields are not constant, meaning their value can be changed at runtime.

The readonly keyword, like const, is used to declare a constant field. However, unlike const, a readonly field can be initialized either at the time it is declared or in the constructor of the type. Once a value is assigned to a readonly field, it cannot be changed. Readonly fields are not implicitly static and their value is not known at compile time.

So when should you use each of these keywords? Use const for values that are truly constant and known at compile time, such as mathematical or physical constants. Use static for values that are shared across all instances of a type, such as a counter that increments with every new instance of the type. Use readonly for values that are constant for each instance of a type, but are not known at compile time, such as a configuration setting that is set in the constructor.

In summary, const, static, and readonly are all used to define constants in C#, but they have different implications and usage scenarios. Understanding the differences between these keywords will help you choose the right one for your specific use case.

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